Definition of Blow Over in English :

Define Blow Over in English

Blow Over meaning in English

Meaning of Blow Over in English

Pronunciation of Blow Over in English

Blow Over pronunciation in English

Pronounce Blow Over in English

Blow Over

see synonyms of blow over

Verb

1. blow over, evanesce, fade, fleet, pass, pass off

disappear gradually

Example Sentences:
'The pain eventually passed off'

WordNet Lexical Database for English. Princeton University. 2010.


Blow Over

see synonyms of blow over
verb (intr, adverb)
1. 
to cease or be finished
the storm blew over
2. 
to be forgotten
the scandal will blow over

Collins English Dictionary. Copyright © HarperCollins Publishers


Blow Over

see synonyms of blow over
1. 
to move away, as rain clouds
2. 
to pass over or by; be forgotten

Webster’s New World College Dictionary, 4th Edition. Copyright © 2010 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.


Blow Over

see synonyms of blow over
v. blew (bl), blown (blōn), blow·ing, blows
v.intr.
1.
a. To be in a state of motion. Used of the air or of wind.
b. To move along or be carried by the wind: Her hat blew away.
c. To move with or have strong winds: The storm blew all night.
2.
a. To expel a current of air, as from the mouth or from a bellows.
b. To produce a sound by expelling a current of air, as in sounding a wind instrument or a whistle.
c. To breathe hard; pant.
d. To release air or gas suddenly; burst or explode: The tire blew when it hit the pothole.
e. To spout moist air from the blowhole. Used of a whale.
3.
a. To fail or break down, as from being operated under extreme or improper conditions: The furnace blew during the cold snap.
b. To melt or otherwise become disabled. Used of a fuse.
4.
a. Informal To move very fast in relation to something: The boy blew past the stands on his bike.
b. Slang To go away; depart: It's time to blow.
5. Informal To boast.
6. Vulgar Slang To be disgustingly disagreeable or offensive: This movie blows.
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to move by means of a current of air: The wind blew the boat out to sea.
b. To drive a current of air on, in, or through: blew my hair dry after I shampooed it.
c. To clear out or make free of obstruction by forcing air through: blew his nose all through allergy season.
d. To shape or form (glass, for example) by forcing air or gas through at the end of a pipe.
2.
a. To expel (air) from the mouth.
b. To cause air or gas to be expelled suddenly from: We blew a tire when we drove over the rock.
3. Music
a. To cause (a wind instrument) to sound.
b. To sound: a bugle blowing taps.
4.
a. To cause to be out of breath.
b. To allow (a winded horse) to regain its breath.
5. To demolish by the force of an explosion: An artillery shell blew our headquarters apart.
6. To lay or deposit eggs in. Used of certain insects.
7.
a. To cause to fail or break down, as by operating at extreme or improper conditions: blew the engine on the last lap.
b. To cause (a fuse) to melt or become disabled.
8. Slang
a. To spend (money) freely and rashly. See Synonyms at waste.
b. To spend money freely on; treat: blew me to a sumptuous dinner.
9.
a. Slang To spoil or lose through ineptitude: blew the audition; blew a three-goal lead. See Synonyms at botch.
b. To cause (a covert intelligence operation or operative) to be revealed and thereby jeopardized: a story in the press that blew their cover; an agent who was blown by the opposition.
10.
a. Slang To depart (a place) in a great hurry: Let's blow this city no later than noon.
b. Baseball To throw (a pitch) so fast that a batter cannot swing fast enough to hit it: blew a fastball by the batter for the strikeout.
11. Vulgar Slang To perform fellatio on.
n.
1. The act or an instance of blowing.
2.
a. A blast of air or wind.
b. A storm.
3. Informal An act of bragging.
4. Slang Cocaine.

The American Heritage ® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2018 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.